>Part 1: How to Make a yoyo Advent Calender

>This is the start of a continuing tutorial. This will show you how to make the wall hanging part of the calendar. Then, each day I will post how to make one or more ornaments to hang on the tree ’till I have 25. This way you can make it, too. (Above photo is after star, prior to buttons)

Supplies:

  • Green fabrics (you can use 1 or lots of green fabrics, I choose solid for the tree and variety for the ground) 42 green yoyos tree, 25 green yoyos ground = total 67 green yoyos
  • White fabrics (you can use 1 or lots of white fabrics) ( I used recycled 100% cotton, from my husband’s outgrown Sunday shirts, 2 of them) 86 white yoyos
  • Red fabrics (you can use 1 or lots of red fabrics, I used lots of varieties) 67 red yoyos
  • Brown fabric enough for 1 yoyo
  • Yellow fabric enough for 1 yoyo for star (I used the small clover flower maker to make my star)
  • Standard cd to use as template
  • Thread
  • Needle
  • Scissors
  • Thimble (if you use one)
  • Pencil, optional (for tracing around cd; I don’t do this, but some might)
  • Optional small clover flower maker to use in making the star. You can also just buy a star at a store and sew it on instead of making one.
  • 2- 4 cabone rings ( or other type of ring to use as a hanger)
  • Dowel or other straight item for strength when hanging
  • Bias tape
  • 67 buttons (I used mother-of-pearl, but you can use whatever you want)

Photo to upper right is what the back looks like.

Order of events:

  • Make round yoyos and yoyo star
  • Lay them out in the pattern (shown below in this post)
  • Stitch together in six format, not the 4
  • Add star at top of tree
  • Stitch a button on every green yoyo
  • Stitch on cabone rings (or other hanger item) on back of wall hanging on top row of yoyos; covered by bias tape
  • Stitch dowel (or other straight item) to top back of quilt to help prevent sagging from weight; covered by bias tape

There are 21 rows in this wall hanging.

  1. 11 red
  2. 1 red 8 white 1 red
  3. 1 red 4 white 1 green 4 white 1 red
  4. 1 red 3 white 2 green 3 white 1 red
  5. 1 red 3 white 3 green 3 white 1 red
  6. 1 red 3 white 2 green 3 white 1 red
  7. 1 red 3 white 3 green 3 white 1 red
  8. 1 red 2 white 4 green 2 white 1 red
  9. 1 red 3 white 3 green 3 white 1 red
  10. 1 red 2 white 4 green 2 white 1 red
  11. 1 red 2 white 5 green 2 white 1 red
  12. 1 red 2 white 4 green 2 white 1 red
  13. 1 red 2 white 5 green 2 white 1 red
  14. 1 red 1 white 6 green 1 white 1 red
  15. 1 red 4 white 1 brown 4 white 1 red
  16. 1 red 2 white 4 red 2 white 1 red
  17. 1 red 3 white 3 red 3 white 1 red
  18. 1 red 8 green 1 red
  19. 1 red 9 green 1 red
  20. 1 red 8 green 1 red
  21. 11 red

Stitch all yoyos together and hand stitch star at top of tree. You can do this same type of pattern with English paper pieced hexagons. If you want to use this other technique, go here; there is a tutorial.

Add front embellishments like the star and buttons now. The buttons are for holding the ornaments on the tree. They are also to hold the ornaments on the bottom ground area ’till they are moved up. There are more buttons on the tree than on the ground so you can have more of a choice where to place them.

Stitch two to four cabone rings (or other hanging devises — I used metal belt loops because that is what I had on hand) on top row for hanging purposes. Use four if you don’t use a dowel for strength and to keep quilt from sagging. Once stitched on, cover stitches with bias tape, too, just like the dowel.

Here is the link to make all the ornaments to add to this advent calendar.

DO NOT USE THIS PATTERN TO MAKE THINGS TO SELL FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY!!!!

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>Free yo-yo crochet pattern on line

>

The choker and bracelet pattern I did for crochet magazine is now available on line for  free.  If you are interested in starting a quick and simple pattern this is for you .  You can use the perle cotton it suggests or knit cro sheen.

my pattern is now available for free

>Two projects but all hexes

>

two projects

It might be hard for you to see but there are two projects being worked on in this photo. One is obvious a hexagon english paper piced quilt ( small wall size) tutorial here. Which happenes to be using the real thing vintage feedsack fabrics. The other is right below it and is an all wool afghan made using this tutorial. Still have some work to do on both of these. You may not have seen me for a few days but that never means my hands are doing nothing they are always busy.

>An interesting turn on English Paper Piecing

>Have you seen this tutorial. I think it is such a nice new concept on EPP. Sort of like a yoyo quilt or Cathedral windows in that as you add the pieces to the quilt you are done with that piece don’t have to go back, and you quilt as you go so thatis already done too. Wish I had thought of it but it does open up ideas for me. I will have to try this in the future. Here is a goggle translation into english. This tutorial was found through a link I saw on this blog.

>English Paper Piecing Question

>

Flower Garden in progress - detail

This picture was posted in The English paper piecing group on flickr. A discussion arose about how to baste large hex pieces. My tutorial explained it, but visuals are better. I do have permission to show this example of how not to do it by its maker, Anne Brumley. Pictured are her first blocks; I actually think they are well made. I do not see the stitching between the blocks, her fabric choices are vibrant and lively. I just want it clear that these are well-made blocks, and the only thing I wanted to clarify was all the basting threads. All the threads you see have to be removed; there are also lots of them, which makes that time consuming and your fingers will hurt from going through the papers so much with the needle.

In the way I do it, all you have to do is cut six small threads; just six small nips of the scissors, then pull the papers out (which saves time) and just leave in the basteing threads.

front of two inch hex

So, you do a back stitch in each corner where the fabric folds over on top of itself. Then, in the middle of each side of the hex you do an ever so tiny stitch that goes through the fabric and the paper. I have made a few things with this technique, so I promise it is simple and not hard.

2 inch hex helping with example

Go all the way around in this manner; cut thread when you get back to the beginning. I hope this helps whomever does bigger pieces in English paper piecing. Below are other examples of Anne’s work; she uses silk in some of her work, and it is lovely. She picks very nice fabrics and has good hand piecing skills; she is a very nice hand seamstress.

Flower Garden in progress 1
1 inch hexagons
1 inch hexagons
On my way.  How cool is the lucky kitty fabric?

Neat tesselations with rainbow!

>explore photos

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1. butterfly pillow, 2. suzyhomemakers mini quilt is done, 3. This block is made by clare, 4. 1st finished butterfly for curtain, 5. lt and dk pink tatting, 6. hex granny squares, 7. more antique tatting, 8. antique tatting,9. front, 10. redwork butterfly signature block, 11. style d, 12. layette set, 13. crazy daisies, 14. flower tutorial, 15. English Paper piecing tutorial, 16. bubble gum pink quilt #1,17. lazy daisy week 3, 18. back side dove, 19. felt snow man done, style:christmas colors

Created with fd’s Flickr Toys.

>Explore Photos as of July 27, 2007

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