White work

front collar detailback detail

I had mentioned some time back that my oldest daughter was being taught white work by me for a project she was doing for school.  She did all the embroidery then I assembled the dress for her a mother and daughter effort.  I think she did a great job for her first time effort she even went as far to hand embroider each button hole.

the other sleevemore sleeve detailsleeve detail

The tatting is some antique that I had that we added to make the dress a little fancier.  She could have made the tatting herself ( as I taught her to tat in the last a few years) or I could have made some even fancier but since we already had white we just choose to use it instead.

center front hem detail
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>HS1010: Some patterns I want to keep track of

>

#9395: Ladies’ Tucked Waist: Circa 1915

http://www.pastpatterns.com/9395.html

#405 Two Tucked Waists.

http://www.pastpatterns.com/405.html

404 Edwardian Gibson Tuck Blouse.

http://www.pastpatterns.com/404.html

#4830: Ladies’ One-Piece Kitchen Apron: Circa 1910

http://www.pastpatterns.com/4830.html

#5462: Skirts: 1910 – 1913

http://www.pastpatterns.com/5462.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/freepatterns/w1889ochemise.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/freepatterns/w1896bolbodice.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/articles/w1895skirt.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/freepatterns/w1905slessblouse.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/freepatterns/w1907shirtwaist.html
http://www.pastpatterns.com/1900.html
 http://www.pastpatterns.com/1900.html
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/articles/1912frocksxmas.html#EveningDress
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/articles/1910blouses.html
http://www.venacavadesign.co.uk/Products/Simple_Edwardian_Blouse.html
http://www.vintageconnection.net/EdwardianShirtWaistPattern.htm

>HS101: Mock rolled hem by hand

>Supplies

  • Needle (size 10 crewel needle)
  • thread to match fabric this is a regular weight 100% cotton sewing thread
  • fabric 

How to:

  • Clean up edge by trimming off all ravels
  • turn the raw edge to the wrong side (1/8 inch) (actual hem will be about 1/2 of this width that was pressed)
    • press well
    • press for rolled hem
  • Attach thread into the fabric fold (securing it well ie a knot)
  • Make tiny stitch into the garment just below the raw edge.  Go straight up and go into the fold travel for about 1/4 of an inch. * repeat this up and down motion in stitching.  You should have a series of parallel lines (threads) see photo
    • close up rolled hem
  • when you have made several of these make sure needle is in the fold in the top and pull the thread to close the opening.  This will form a tiny rolled hem.
    • rolled hem simi close up
    • rolled hem
  Heirloom Sewing . Get yours at bighugelabs.com

>HS101: Pintucks

>Supplies
#50 thread heirloom thread
1.6/70 twin needle

twin needle

7 grove or 5 grove pintuck foot (I do not own a 7 groove foot wish I did)

5 grove pintuck footsee 5 groves

I am using the wrong thread in the tutorial it is so you can see it.  Because of its thickness it doesn’t make pin-tucks as well as it would with heirloom thread.  But you will see good examples at the end of the post.

L 2.5

  • Place twin needle in machine and attach grooved pintuck foot
    • twin needle with pintucks
    • When using a twin needle you need to also have two threads of course feedinging into the needles here I have used two colors so you can see them in the photos to come.
      • double threads for a twin needle
  • adjust tension as needed (the bottom tension will need to be a little tighter than normal to pull the two sides of the pin-tuck together)
  • pull a thread
    • pull thread
  • the first pintuck is along the pulled thread hold fabric tight in front an back of the needle. Line up the left needle with the pulled thread line so the pulled thread is hidden and reinforced by this thread.
  • To line up future pin-tucks place the last pin-tuck made into the out-most groove of the pin-tuck foot.  While watching the outside groove with the last pin-tuck in it stitch the next one and continue doing this till you have all made that you need.  The more groves you have your foot the wider you can place the pin-tucks from one another.  You can place them in other groves if you desire them to be closer.  I have not ironed these pin-tucks in this photo so things look a little way but if you notice the threads I have removed you can see the stitches are straight even out a few rows.
    • line up pintuck with edge grove
    • lined up rows

    showing the two sets of holes formed by twin needle

  • leave the tails long so you can use a needle and pull them to the back of the work and make a knot to hold the pin-tucks secure.
    • threads to finish

The photo above and the ones below are from a dress I am making that is full of pin-tucks.

rows of pintucksyoke frontsleeve

On a side note you can make your first line in other ways.  Such as using  a wash out marker and a ruler to mark your first line ( it will not be on the straight of grain thought) and then stitch on this line use heirloom sewing thread size 80 to stitch a straight stitch on the marked line them switch to twin needle and size 50 thread for pintucks.

One other way is to iron in a crease and use that as your guide same thing is true for this as the last it will not be on the straight of grain.  You can do these two other methods but they are not the straight of grain methods nor are they the traditional methods.

  Heirloom Sewing . Get yours at bighugelabs.com

>HS101: tatted lace to fabric

>This type is done almost exactly the same as french lace to fabric.

Use DMC heirloom sewing machine thread when doing this for real and needle size#60, #65 or #70.

For the sample I will just be using normal sewing thread so you can see it easy in the photos and it will be a contrasting color for the same reason.

prep work

1. Cut 1 piece of lace and one piece of fabric the same length
2. Prep by starching and pressing both (using clean iron, and clean board, also use spray starch)  ( if the tatting is homemade out of tatting cord it may not need starting but always better to starch than not to)  this technique only works with store bought lace or homemade lace that has a crochet chain added to the header edge.  The header edge is the edge attached to the fabric.

How to

W=3.0-4.0

L = 0.5

  • place right sides together with the lace being 1/4 to 1/8 of an inch away from the edge of the fabric  (this  piece of lace is handmade by me in size 30 thread then I added a size 80 crochet edge in similar color so I could use a sewing machine to attach it)
    •  placement
    • layout
  • using zig zag stitch stitch over the edge of the fabric and the edge of the lace” the chain stitch”.
  •  sew zig zag satin stich
    • zig zag together
  • press towards fabric
    • wrong side before pressing
      • finishe dwrong side
    • right side
      • finished right side

using correct thread this is what your finished piece should look like

right side finished
 with corect thread
right side finished
with correct thread right side

  Heirloom Sewing . Get yours at bighugelabs.com

>HS101: Lace to Fabric

>

Use DMC heirloom sewing machine thread when doing this for real and needle size#60, #65 or #70.

For the sample I will just be using normal sewing thread so you can see it easy in the photos and it will be a contrasting color for the same reason.

prep work

  1. Cut 1 piece of lace and one piece of fabric the same length
  2. Prep by starching and pressing both (using clean iron, and clean board, also use spray starch)

How to

W=3.0-4.0
L = 0.5

  1. place right sides together with the lace being 1/4 to 1/8 of an inch away from the edge of the fabric
    1. placement
  2. using zig zag stitch stitch over the edge of the fabric and the edge of the lace” the header”. 
    1. sew zig zag satin stich
  3. press towards fabric
    1. wrong side before pressing

using correct thread this is what your finished piece should look like

right side finishedright side finished

  Heirloom Sewing . Get yours at bighugelabs.com

>HS101: Swiss Entredeux to Gathered Fabric and ribbon weaving

>

I am using big needle and bright thread to accommodate the tutorial in yours please use the threads from the supply list.  Because using such big thread and needle on such fine fabric causes issues with the tension of my machine and maybe yours too.

How to judge amount of fabric 2 to 1 ( fabric to entredeux) is always a nice ratio I like to add 1/2 inch so I have a little on each end that is not gathered to go into the seams

2 to 1 ratio
  • Make 2 rows of basting(gathering stitches) Place them 1/8 and 3/8 inch from edge to gather.  
    • two gethreing lines
  • Pull on one thread to  gather being careful not to break the threads spread the gathers over thewhole length of the stitches
    • pull threads carefull to gether
  • to lay the entredeux such that the edge of the entredeux lies between the two gathering stitches.  The red lines on the right in this photo are to show where the bottom gathering stitch is and wear the two new sets of straight stitches are to go.
    • place edge of entredeux between gather lines
  •  stitch in the ditch ( witch means right next to the entredeux stitches (see photo if confused) fabric should be right side up  entredeux right side down (in other words right sides together) and entredeux on top
    • L:2 
  • I made a mistake in mine I was supposed to do another row of stitching here 1/8 of an inch away from the one next to the entredeux I forgot to then I trimmed and realized it  so with yours make sure there are two sets of lines of sewing 
    • stitch next to entredeux
  • trim next to last one
    • sew line next to entredeux and trim
  • Zig zag over the edge you just trimmed to hold it all together
    • W:3 
    • L1
    • zig zag over edge
  • Press entredeux with the seam pressed towards the fabric
  • turn to front of work 
    • press inside seem twords fabric
  • and zig zag into the entredeux holes and over the seam to secure the seam on the back to stay behind the fabric This is supposed to be real tiny stitches they just look big in the tutorial for the example so you can see it
    • W1.5 -2 use which ever you need to to get into the hole of the entredeux and bearly go into the fabric
    • L 1
  • Remove basting thread
    • remove basting threads
  • Stream press the holes should disappear from the basting thread.  Your thread should be the same color as your fabric.  As you can tell mine left a residual it your threads match your fabric that will not be seen.  As mine was such a screaming color it left damage.   But even with that said they are almost impossible to see here too.
    • zig zag over entredeux andfabric to hold seam down

See how on these you can almost not see the basting thread marks and this one was not steamed.

entredeux to gatehred fabric before ribbon weave

This entredeux lends itself to ribbon weaving as youcan see the holes in the first one in the second they are filled with two colored ribbons this is a way of adding more detail and color to your item with out  having to add a real expensive embroidery brightly colored insertion or by doing embroidery.  Use a big eyed crewl embroidery needle to do the weaving. Your work in the weaving should look neat on the front and back do not let the ribbon twist.  This one was steamed and the basting thread marks are gone.

with ribbon weave

      Heirloom Sewing . Get yours at bighugelabs.com

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