>Part 9: felt / sequins / big glitter ornamnets

>

cover image

Supplies:

  • felt
  • sequins, any type
  • big holiday glitter (I used snowflakes)
  • beads or any other embellishment
  • thread
  • needle
  • embroidery floss
  • thimble, if you use one
  • scissors

Because I am showing two ways of attaching sequins with and without holes, I made 4 ornaments; two for the giveaway, and two for my tree. This post counts as two ornament posts (you can leave a comment on yesterday’s so that you get your name entered for today and yesterday) one for yesterday and one for today. Feel free to go back and post a comment on any that you haven’t posted on to get the max entries for this giveaway.

Order of events:

  1. Get sequins and felt, and figure out your layout
  2. Sew on sequins/glitter (with sequins, of course, go through the holes).With glitter you are couching the piece of glitter down. Make sure to get a thread that is a close match to the color of your sequin/glitter.
  3. Add other embellishments such as beads (you can do French knots instead of beads; I just like holiday ornaments with more, not less, so I used beads).
  4. Edging; I did blanket stitch for some, and just an angeled stitch (a real wide satin stitch, meaning lots of space between the stitches) for others. Side note: You can make two and stitch them at this point front to back if you have an advent tree that is free standing. This way, no one would see your stitches on the back. I didn’t do this because mine face the quilt, all hanging, and the backs are not seen.
  5. Add hanger and you’re done!

>Part 2: Cathedral Windows Quilt Tutorial

>

cathedral windows quilt  tutorial

There are two traditional  places to add color to the traditional cathedral windows quilts. The first is shown above which is traditional. The second spot places colored fabric in the long white oval openings as seen in the photo above. But there is actually a third spot to add color which is the background that can be more than one color adding more variety to the blocks.

Quick Traditional method: Easiest
  1. cut 2 1/2 inch squares two for every piece of white fabric you have cut.
  2. place on space where two squares come together pin in place
  3. fold over edges pin in place
  4. sew with sewing machine
  5. repeat till done
———————————————————————————————-

Optional Steps
I will start with the optional steps method then move on to traditional version 1 and version 2 and version 3.
This will place color inside the spaces that are white in the photo above. This of course is twice as much work if you do it the first way listed below. The second way is faster but not as thick or as warm of a quilt depends on your final goal. These steps that are optional are added to the traditional method not instead of it.
Optional steps if you want more color you can skip this step as I did in the above photo which will make your quilt go tons faster.
Traditional version 1 : Hardest to make
most work but a much warmer quilt (tons more work than traditional)
repeat steps 1-6 (from how to construct block)but in color and with a 6 1/2 inch square you will end up with a square that will fit under your flaps of your fabric ruffly 4 1/2 inch square. Stitch corners together by hand and stitch 1 or 2 stitches through the color fabric piece to tack it in place for now.
Traditional version 2: Medium
a little more work than traditional and a little warmer
cut 5 inch color squares of fabric also cut a 4 1/2 inch card stock template. Lay cardstock template over each color square and fold over the 1/4 inch seam allowance on all sides and press in place pull out cardstock and repeat for every 5 inch color square
Traditional version 3: Easy
a tiny bit more work than the traditional and a little warmer
Just cut 4 1/2 inch squares the same number you cut of white squares and place below flaps. Stitch corners together by hand and stitch 1 or 2 stitches through the color fabric piece to tack it in place for now.

—————————————————

Tutorial parts

Part 1 cathedral windows ( background)
Part 2 Cathedral windows ( color filler squares) this post

Amy underconstruction

front under construction
 

This is I think the last dress Amy wears in the play ( I still have a few others to make for her).  This one is still under construction.  This is the bodice piece it will have a skirt that uses this embroidered fabric and it will also have a flounce on the skirt in coral orange same fabric I used on Meg's last dress that I showed.   It will also have a sort of gathered ruched bustle but not a true bustle.  This dress has caused me issues in making it the patten did not come out as the manufacturer designed it to ie to big in the waist. 
Read more »

2nd peplum for Jo

front of jacket jo

backskirtThe 2nd peplum jacket  I am showing is the very last outfit Jo wears in the play.  It is spring time so soft feminine colors.  This is also when Mr. Bear proposes to her.  So I wanted it to have a hint of girlishness with eyelet and pink skirt.
Read more »

1 of 2 peplums for Jo

detail front

I have made two peplum jackets for the character Jo in the play with matching skirts these are for the final two scenes of the play.

lace cuff

tailsThe second to last one is the brown one  it is more of a fall winter scene and I wanted the dress to carry that color them with it.
Read more »

Meg’s dress

front megs dress

shawldetail of fabric ( back side of fabric being used as right side)This is the dress Meg is wearing right before she gets married in the play. The fabric is actually an ugly brown color that looked dirty and such to me. So what did I do
Read more »

The rest of Hanna’s wardrobe

Warning this post is heavy with pictures .  frontUp to this point you have seen four aprons for the character Hanna (servant) in the play Little Woman.   Well I have been sewing like crazy the last few days and Hanna now has 2 jackets, 1 geribaldi shirt, 2 skirts, 1 petticoat and 1 set of bloomers to add to her costume attire.  It also means that this character is now fully costumed and done.  I still have 11 other players to finish costumes on but having 1 done is a good feeling.  Because Hanna works for the March's sometimes with out pay she does not have much money so her cloths are simple with out much adornment and plain in patterning of fabric ( almost none) because she can only afford to but fabric that are like broadcloth or muslin.  She does have little detail of lace here and there and cording and a few details as was the fashion then.
pantalets
My dress form does not have an off set leg so the pantalets are just pinned to the front for the sake of taking a photo plain in general with a hint of pretty lace at the legs.

lace on hem of pantalets

The petticoat is the same plain with a hint of lace at the hem.

petticoat

shoulderfrontsideThe shirt for this character is a Geribaldi shirt.  Made famous by a military person hwho came to much fame and this is the style of shirt his troops wore.  The buttons on the shirt are true to period ie.  The are antique jet buttons from the civil war to Victorian era.  The lacy cord edge is from about 1920- 1950.  The other trims are also vintage just don't know exactly there age the piping on the sleeves is I think the 1960-1970's.  The soutoche braid I think is from about 1920 and the single fold seam binding used on the hem is from 1960's.
Read more »

Previous Older Entries